Teacher Programs

The NJCH Teacher Institute provides professional development programs for New Jersey K-12 educators and recognizes outstanding work by teachers of humanities disciplines. Questions relating to Teacher Institute programming should be directed to Mary Grace Whealan at mwhealan@njch.org

Applications are now available for submission through an online form. Please direct any questions to MaryGrace Whealan, Program Officer for teacher workshops, at mwhealan@njch.org.  Please note, applications must be submitted in full. 

justice - world hands

Build confidence teaching controversial topics, social responsibility & critical thinking with two NEW offerings from the New Jersey Council for the Humanities.

  • Teaching Ferguson and Beyond

April 24 at Kean University Registration fee: $30 Help students think critically while engaging with media & primary documents. Explore contemporary racial & political issues through discussion with activists, legal experts, & historians.  Read more by clicking the “Spring Workshops” tab above.  


Untitled design (7)Expand your teaching toolbox this summer with two NEW offerings from the New Jersey Council for the Humanities.

Both courses are 3-day, non-residential, offering 21 hours of professional development credit. Registration is $50:

  • Making Local History Matter

    July 13-15 at Rutgers University – Newark Campus APPLY HERE Build pride-of-place, research skills & engagement with hands-on projects that put students in the role of community historians. Choose from a variety of digital tools & presentation formats that allow students to share their discoveries with audiences & practice historical interpretation. Read more by clicking the “Summer Seminars” tab above.

  • Suffragettes to Senators

    July 20-22 at The Alice Paul Institute APPLY HERE Explore the challenges faced by women concerning the rights of voting & politics. Develop concrete takeaways for teaching about women’s political empowerment. Increase students’ understanding of our democratic systems through exploration of both historical struggles & contemporary women’s issues. Read more by clicking the “Summer Seminars” tab above.

Spring Teacher Workshops

Teacher Institute workshops are professional development sessions that take place during the course of the academic school year.  Activities at the seminars include lectures, discussions,  films, writing workshops, curriculum planning, and opportunities to network with scholars and teaching colleagues.

Untitled design (10)Teaching Ferguson and Beyond

April 24 (Friday) 9 AM – 4 PM Kean University

Presenters: Dr. Abigail Perkiss, Kean University, David Dante Troutt, CLiME at Rutgers University, Junius Williams, Rutgers University

Help students think critically while engaging with media & primary documents. Explore contemporary racial & political issues through discussion with activists, legal experts, & historians. Topics include:

  • Historical Contextualization: How have the structural forces of segregation led us to Ferguson and modern America in 2015?
  • Protest and Activism: How have grassroots community-based movements mobilized responses past and present?
  • Creating Safe Spaces: How can we use art, literature and other sources to facilitate conversations about difficult topics in our classrooms?
  • Making Curricular Connections: How can we bring these topics into classrooms through primary source documents, young adult literature, etc.?

Registration: $30. 7 Hours of Professional Development Credit.

Meet the Speakers:

David Troutt    The founding director of the Rutgers Center on Law in Metropolitan Equality (CLiME), David Dante Troutt has written, spoken, and taught extensively on the topic of the metropolitan dimensions of race, class and legal structure.  Through his position at CLiME, he works to develop more inclusive laws and policies of equality amid the growing racial and ethnic diversity of metropolitan America.  Junius Williams  A noted attorney, musician, and educator, Junius Williams began his civil rights work in the 1960s as an activist in the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).  He has worked as a street organizer, a lawyer, and a public school advocate.  As Director of the Abbott Leadership Institute, he is committed to mentoring youth to become leaders. David Troutt (2)    An innovative teacher who has worked extensively with role-playing modules for high school and college social studies units, Abigail Perkiss’ primary academic research centers on the history of race, ethnicity, and urban identity in post-WWII American cities.  

Summer Teacher Seminars

Teacher Institute seminars are three-day tuition-free courses; lunch is provided. Activities at the seminars include lectures, discussions,  films, writing workshops, curriculum planning, and opportunities to network with scholars and teaching colleagues.

Untitled design (9)Making Local History Matter

July 13-15 at Rutgers University – Newark Campus

In partnership with The Clement A. Price Institute on Ethnicity, Culture, and the Modern American Experience at Rutgers University-Newark, this workshop will provide teachers with tools to build students’ historical research skills with hands-on projects that put students in the role of community historians. Workshop participants will choose from a variety of digital tools and presentation formats that allow students to share their discoveries with audiences and practice historical interpretation. In preparation for the city’s 350th anniversary in 2016, the workshop will use Newark as a laboratory and model for community engaged historical research.  Session presenters will include archivists, curators, and public historians working in both traditional and online formats.

Topics include:

  • Monuments and Memorials: Why are memory and commemoration important? How can physical structures be used as primary sources?
  • Oral History: Collecting memory with a purpose. Learn about best practices for recording oral histories and learn how to work with students on oral history projects in the classroom
  • Maps and Mapping: Integrating technology and geography into the social studies and English classrooms
  • Online and pop-up exhibits: How do we create collections? Get hands on with some tools for creating simple, easy-to-use, easy-to-access exhibitions either virtual or physical

Content Standards:

  • 6.1  B - U.S. History: America in the World – Geography, People and the Environment  
  • 6.1 D – History, Culture, and Perspective
  • Workshop content will link directly to standards including community, state, and national change over time, the evolution of American identity, and the role of historical symbols, monuments, and holidays we celebrate. It will also offer the opportunity to study public art and architecture, highlighting contributions of men and women from various ethnic, cultural, and religious backgrounds.

REGISTRATION FEE: $50

21 HOURS OF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Untitled design (8)Suffragists to Senators

July 20-22 at The Alice Paul Institute

In partnership with The Alice Paul Institute and The Center for American Women and Politics (CAWP), this workshop is designed to inspire teachers to explore the challenges faced by women concerning the rights of voting and politics. This three day workshop will increase students’ understanding of our democratic systems through exploration of both historical struggles and contemporary women’s issues.  By developing concrete takeaways for teaching about women’s political empowerment, Suffragists to Senators will provide ideas, tools, and resources that can energize girls and young women to follow in the footsteps of women leaders, past and present, while teaching all students to rethink what leadership means on both a local and larger scale.

Topics include:

  • Suffrage history: Alice Paul and More
  • Suffrage and women in political life during the mid-20th century
  • Women in political cartoons: Past and present
  • Where are women in the contemporary political sphere?

Content Standards:

  • 6.1 A – U.S. History: Civics, Government & Human Rights  
  • 6.1 D – History, Culture, and Perspectives
  • Content Statement 6 (Emergence of Modern America 1890-1930) onward
  • Standards will be specifically addressed by focusing on important women leaders. The workshop will utilize political cartoons as primary source documents, offering tools for teachers to use with students as they develop past and contemporary connections. From the expansion of the women’s suffrage movement to contemporary issues facing women in politics, this course will place emphasis on civics, the role of government, and human rights–and how those topics have changed in the last 150 years.

REGISTRATION FEE: $50

21 HOURS OF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Meet the Workshop Leader:

David Troutt (3)
Michelle Moravec is a professor at Rosemont College in Philadelphia.  Specializing in women’s studies and history, Dr. Moravec has completed several digital history projects and is the digital humanities editor for Women and Social Movements.  Her current project is The Politics of Women’s Culture, which uses a combination of digital and traditional approaches to produce an intellectual history of women’s culture.  Follow Dr. Moravec on Twitter HERE!

Teachers tell us:

  • NJCH has made learning come alive for me, and that always makes it easier to bring learning alive for my students.
  • It’s like camp for educators – I left inspired with big ideas.
  • The varied content knowledge helps me connect the curriculum to individual students’ lives and interests; they see the world differently.
  • I find new ways to help my students explore themselves as citizens of a world outside my classroom.
  • It’s like camp for educators – I left inspired with big ideas.
  • There’s a breadth and depth of information that is so useful.
  • Talking with other teachers gets me inspired. I’m rejuvenated hearing about their experiences.
  • I can focus on developing content and craft.
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