Mini-Grants

Guidelines for Mini-Grant Applications

The New Jersey Council for the Humanities awards mini-grants of up to $3,000 to New Jersey-based nonprofit organizations and public entities four times a year.  Recent awards have supported a wide variety of public humanities projects.

Planning grants are available to first-time applicants with limited staffs that might benefit from the assistance of a humanities scholar in developing a public humanities project.

The Council is especially interested in projects that address the Council’s theme of Justice, which encourages historical, philosophical, legal, political and/or cross-cultural reflection upon the concept of justice and its application in community and social institutions.

Complete information on the Council’s mini-grant program can be found in its 2013 Program Guide.  Organizations with questions about the program or project ideas to discuss are invited to contact the Council’s grants officer, Robert Apgar, at 609-695-4838 or [email protected].

Recent Mini-Grant Awards

If you’re trying to decide if a grant from the New Jersey Council for the Humanities is right for you, you may wish to begin by reading about some recently funded projects.  Listed below are the Council’s twenty latest mini-grant awards.  You can click on each title for additional details about that project.  A complete grant history can be found on the Grants Search page in the sidebar menu.

Hair for All
Passenger Pigeon Project
Notable New Jersey - Programs to Celebrate NJ350
A Window into the World of Post-Reconstruction, Shining a Light on Today: The Legacy of T. Thomas Fortune
35 in 350: The Story of New Jersey
Celebrating NJ 350th Anniversary through Literature
Museum Diaries: Archaeology and Anthropology through the Curator's Eye
Newark '74: Rethinking the 'Puerto Rican Riots'
The Presidency and Race: Fifty Years After the Civil Rights Act of 1964
Nonconformist Diaspora: Unofficial Soviet Art in the United States
Concentric Circles of Influence: Queenston Press - Yesterday and Today
Princeton Area Historic Sites Celebrate New Jersey
The Civil War in 1863
The East Brunswick Roots Project
Animating the Whitall House & Red Bank Battlefield: An Interactive History Experience
Picturing Justice
Our Poetry, Ourselves: A Look at the Influence of Poetry in the United States
John Henry Pop Lloyd Sports Symposium
Commemorative Program for the 75th Anniversary of Kristallnacht
Understanding the Long Rippling Effect of Nazi Propaganda for the Arab World

Mini-Grant Application Process

The New Jersey Council for the Humanities would like to hear from you!  All prospective applicants are encouraged to contact the Council to discuss their project ideas before beginning work on a draft application.  The Council’s grants officer, Robert Apgar, can be reached at 609-695-4838 or [email protected].

All mini-grant applications must be submitted in accordance with the Council’s grants program calendar.  Please note that draft submissions are REQUIRED.

Grant Type Maximum Request Draft Deadline Application Deadline Notification of Decision For Projects Beginning
Mini $3,000 January 15

April 15

July 15

October 15

February 18

May 15

August 15

November 17

March

June

September

December

On/after May 1

On/after August 1

On/after Nov. 1

On/after Feb. 1

All formal submissions are REQUIRED to be made through the Council’s online grant system.  If you are a first time applicant, you will be asked to create a new account.  Prospective applicants are encouraged to begin the online registration process as soon as possible.

Tips to Strengthen Your Mini-Grant Application

As you work on your mini-grant proposal, you may wish to explore the guidance and samples provided for each application section listed below.  REMEMBER: The Council awards its grants through a competitive proposal review process.  You’ll want to take the time to prepare a submission that’s as competitive as possible.

Guiding Questions

As you work on the Goals section of your application, ask yourself the following questions:

  1. Have I clearly defined what would constitute a successful project?
  2. Will this project encourage public thought and discussion?
  3. Have I designed this project to have a lasting impact?
  4. Is the format carefully designed and appropriate for the information being presented and the project’s intellectual goals?  Is it creative?
  5. Will the materials and resources developed usefully support the project’s interpretive themes and ideas?

 

Think Like a Reviewer

It’s very important that reviewers have a clear understanding of what you’re trying to do, particularly in terms of the project’s public impact, and how you plan to get there.  Your stated goal should not simply be to host an event or attract an audience, but to impart something specific to participants.  Your project should be carefully designed to serve that larger purpose.  You should be able to explain why your goal is important and unique, especially to your community and in relationship to the Council’s mission and values.  Reviewers also need to believe that the goals you propose can be achieved.

Consider This

Compare and contrast the following examples. Why do you think the first applicant was successful and the second applicant was not?

Example 1: From a Successful Applicant

The purpose of these programs, including the film series, panel discussion/lecture–all open to the public, are designed to foster reflection about the complex historical relationship among Jews and Catholics in Italy during Holocaust and to promote dialogue among the Catholic and Jewish communities of the Greater Newark Metropolitan Area about the common challenges we face today. Given the presence of a large Italian and Jewish demographic in Northern New Jersey, the exhibit and programming provides an unprecedented opportunity to promote an inter-ethnic, inter-faith conversation on our past and present goals. Together with the exhibit on Assisi and the Jews, we hope that the film screenings and panel discussion/lecture will engender conversations among audience members regarding the personal sacrifices that people made during the Holocaust to ensure the mutual survival of the Jewish and Italian people under Nazi occupation. We hope that by attending these events and seeing the exhibition on Assisi and the Jews, that audience members will be able to talk openly and honestly about the historical relationship among Catholics and Jews in Italy and by doing so develop greater respect and tolerance for people of their respective faiths. Audience members at the lecture/panel discussion with be provided with ample time to ask questions and answers of the keynote speaker and panelists. Film screenings will be followed by discussions facilitated by humanities scholars who will provide context and field questions from the audience about the themes presented in the films. The central theme of the exhibit and the programs surrounding it pertains to issues of faith as a motivating force in resistance to injustice. This exhibit, focused on personal and institutional sacrifice in the pursuit of justice should resonate strongly with the the values of the NJCH to promote tolerance, embrace diversity, and spur reflection on matters of social justice.

Example 2: From an Unsuccessful Applicant

Our program will include panel-discussions and lectures from invited speakers, in order to educate our audiences about the importance of art in unifying our diverse community. These discussions will be initiated by three exhibitions throughout the year that will showcase the talented artists throughout our communities. This project is essential to the city because it is a very diverse community and the arts play an important role in ensuring that this will continue.

Because of their creative and detail-oriented nature, artists have a greater understanding of their communities and a more fine-tuned awareness of the cultural aspects embedded within them. With our events, we hope to give our audience the opportunity to discover the artistic details within their own lives. The gallery hopes to accomplish this by discussing the simultaneous diversity and unity that occurs within communities, as well as the culture and tradition that are involved in an artist’s processes. By having these programs, we will elicit international, national, and local talented artists, both professional and emerging in the field, to exhibit works as a means of art education for the public. These events will show the community that art is part of a cultural signature and is strongly part of our cultural traditions, which artists use to convey a greater meaning in their art. Additionally, we hope to educate people on how those from different ways of life interpret art in different ways. Another one of our goals is to put emphasis on our lectures, which will draw attention to the importance of art to establishing traditions and cultures.

Our gallery is an artistic hub of expression that is interested in creating longevity for the humanities aspects within our society. Having these events will foster our audience to, not only take the time to look at art, but to interpret the art that they see before them. Thus, when the public comes to our events, they will gain a greater understanding of the artist’s thought processes and knowledge base about the cultural traditions in their communities. With the help of our lectures and panel discussions, they will be able to learn how art is the basis of the things. This theme is further essential to our community, because our city is a community that is in transition. Once people start having intellectual discussions about the culture of our city, it will continue the conversation in this direction. Therefore, with these Art Salons, we can initiate a radical change throughout the city that leads us to be a more knowledgable and involved culture. Further with these panels, we will be able to create a new awareness for our audiences.

Guiding Questions

As you work on the Humanities Content section of your application, ask yourself the following questions:

  1. Is this project likely to contribute to public understanding and/or use of the humanities?
  2. Will a public audience understand the humanities ideas being presented?
  3. Is the humanities scholarship informing the project sound and relevant?

 

Think Like a Reviewer

Reviewers are not looking for a simple listing of humanities disciplines or a general explanation of benefits that can be derived from humanistic study.  They are looking to understand how, specifically, you plan to make use of the humanities.  You should clearly explain the analytical or interpretive approach that you will be using to explore your project topic and identify the context in which information will be placed.  The most competitive projects are those that employ humanities scholars (credentialed individuals who professionally engage in humanities-based research) with experience in the chosen topic area.  Reviewers must also be convinced that the information, as presented, will be both accessible and meaningful to a public audience.

 

Consider This

Compare and contrast the following examples. Why do you think the first applicant was successful and the second applicant was not?

Example 1: From a Successful Applicant

Place — the place of one’s birth and/or early upbringing is fundamentally important in the human experience, and, therefore, concomitantly central to the humanities which seek to understand and articulate that experience.

As the context of our earliest development, a place — village, town, state, or country — shapes our character, in the broadest sense of the word, in its most formative stages. In our afterlives this place of birth and/or upbringing — where we “come from” — is crucial in defining our own and others’ concept of our identity, of who we are.

In the modern age, specifically, place is both less important and, at the same time, more important than ever before. The rapid and easy means of communication and transportation afforded by modern technology make where one lives and works in many ways immaterial, and yet for that same reason, make it all the more significant: since the nineteenth century, when for the first time in history it became possible for the average person to choose where he or she might live, there has been a concomitantly more acute craving for the belongingness, identity, and even inspiration, that a particular locale can provide.

The proposed series (organized under the rubrics of “Dramatizing Jersey,” “Writing Jersey,” “Singing Jersey,” “Living Jersey,” and “Painting Jersey”) will explore the contextual and inspirational role of “Jersey” — understood both as a cluster of geographical locations as well as a cluster of emotional significances — in the interdisciplinary humanities (painting, poetry, fiction, music, tv drama) as well as in experiments in living (utopian communities). The painting of George Inness (1825-94), the writing of poet William Carlos Williams (1883-1963) and novelist Philip Roth (1933-), the music of pop idol Bruce Springsteen (1949-), and the currently popular TV reality show Jersey Shore, will serve as examples of some of the arts and humanities (past and present, “high” and “low”) that have been inspired, in some sense, by New Jersey, while a sample of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century utopian communities formerly located in various places in the state will serve as examples of experiments in living.

In addition to the established academic fields of the fine arts, literature, music, drama, history, anthropology, cultural studies, communication studies, and American studies embraced by the present proposal, the new and emerging field of “Geo-Humanities.”

Example 2: From an Unsuccessful Applicant

The role of technology in our lives cannot be understated. And it keeps growing. It engenders awe, fear and reverence, all at once. It has toppled governments and helped people to find their perfect mates. It has advanced medical analysis and treatment and helped us to see universes we only imagined existed. Who can imagine a time without cell phones, instant gratification in finding information, virtual contact? And these roles continue to expand each moment.

Dance is a visceral art, best experienced in the moment. In many ways it is directly the opposite of a virtual experience. We see the dance in its present form, in the room, only once in that exact way. The dancers are human, the space is static but changes based upon the prevailing ethos of the audience and the vagaries time and space, perspective and who is coughing in the seat next to you. The performers are charged with filling the space with their bodies, creating and sharing moving art within the parameters of the choreographer’s vision. They inhabit the space and define it.
Structuring the story space is the job of the choreography. Design should facilitate and support the “story space” already created by the choreography. Lighting and music are so primal in dance because they don’t have a literal, narrative meaning. They demand no interpretation. So the gentle and often delicate “story space” (or “resonance” when the dance is non-narrative) can exist unimpeded. One has to be more careful with physical sets in this regard, especially in dance.

Once any design concretizes meaning within the piece it demands perception and thinking from the audience. Any design that encapsulates meaning demands interpretation. In other words, if you see a large (even abstract) image surrounding the dancers you will have to commit some brainpower to interpreting what this image is. What is that image? What does it mean? Does it have meaning? Why does it come now? Why does it change now? Why are the dancers ignoring it? Why are they paying attention to it? How have other images impacted our perceptions indelibly in Art and Architecture throughout history? How has that changed with the advent of digital media? Our Panel will seek to explore these questions and in doing so challenge themselves and our audience to relate this clearly to how technology impacts them in their daily lives through this context.

 

Guiding Questions

As you work on the Audience Description and Publicity Plan sections of your application, ask yourself the following questions:

  1. Have I thoughtfully and imaginatively identified interested audiences and project partners?
  2. Were target audiences considered and engaged during the project planning process?
  3. Will the target audiences likely attend at the chosen venue?
  4. Will the planned publicity reach a broad public audience, as well as specific target audiences?

 

Think Like a Reviewer

Your programs must be free and open to all, but you should be able to clearly identify and describe your target audience.  Reviewers will want to know how your project design and marketing efforts have been tailored to specific audience needs and interests.  A FREE marketing handbook can be found on the Resources page listed in the sidebar menu of this webpage and may be helpful as you craft a publicity plan for your project.  The most competitive projects are those that engage appropriate partners early in the planning process.  Reviewers like to see projects that have buy-in from the larger community and will be looking for projects that are designed to achieve maximum public impact.

 

Consider This

Compare and contrast the following examples. Why do you think the first applicant was successful and the second applicant was not?

Example 1: From a Successful Applicant

Audience Description: Our library audience is a diverse group of people with a wide variety of interests. Programs of African heritage usually bring in a minimum audience of 40 and up to 300. This program will be attended by African immigrants, children of African immigrants who were born in the United States, immigrant children arriving here at a young age, non-African spouses of immigrants, African Americans, scholars, community leaders, religious groups and other interested people from the community. Members of the Library African Advisory Board who were involved with the library in choosing ideas for the program will be present at the programs. African library patrons and participants in the survey for Africans in our town will also be present. They will learn about the African community in New Jersey that is very similar to the other areas where African immigrants settled in the United States. People attending the lecture series will be mostly educated Africans and African Americans while the exhibit and cultural event will bring in the entire family from all age groups.

Publicity Plan: This program will be published in the township newspaper that is distributed to every home, school and business in our community. The library also has a database of emails that receive our program information. Our programs are also sent to library partners who circulate the information to their members. Three months in advance, the program information will be circulated as save the date. Programs will be sent to major newspapers around the region. It will also be published through the library e-newsletter, Facebook, twitter, pinterest and other social networks operated by the library. Flyers and postcards will be made and distributed in the library, churches and businesses especially where we expect large African concentration. An exhibit of corresponding books will be displayed with the flyers. Signage outside the library will also be on display. The Library African Advisory Board, which participated in selecting topics for the lecture series, will also assist with publicity to their individual groups, social network and community.

Example 2: From an Unsuccessful Applicant

Audience Description: Audience members will include students (in a variety of programs ranging from Science, Technology, Engineering and Math to business and liberal arts majors). Beyond students, administrators, faculty and alumni will not only be invited and participate in this series, they will contribute valuable points and questions. Hoboken residents will certainly be invited to the series and participate in discussions and debates as they have done in the past. Audience numbers in the past have been from 30 to 100 and will be expected to be about the same (the film showing ideally for more than 100).

Publicity Plan: Informing the campus and local community about this lecture series is very important. Thankfully in the past, our program has been successful in gathering interest for a number of events. From posting advertising around campus to churches and local organizations, budgeting for fliers is an important part of the series. Finally, social media like Facebook and Twitter have been useful for informing lecture participants. In terms of a timeline, fliers and social media pages will be posted a month before each event.

Guiding Question

As you work on the Evaluation section of your application, ask yourself the following question:

  1. Do I have a means for measuring whether or not success was achieved?

 

Think Like a Reviewer

The Council requires that grantees report back on the value of their efforts, and for that reason, reviewers will be looking for projects that have a plan in place to measure what has been accomplished, particularly in terms of a project’s public impact.  You should think both qualitatively – what has the audience taken away – and quantitatively – how many people have been served.  When preparing the Evaluation section of your application narrative, you may wish to begin by referring back to your Goals and Audience Description sections.  Consider what you’re trying to measure, what type of information you’ll need, who should be supplying it, and when and how you might most appropriately gather it.  Your plan should be specific and tailored to your project.

 

Consider This

Compare and contrast the following examples. Why do you think the first applicant was successful and the second applicant was not?

Example 1: From a Successful Applicant

We will conduct surveys before and after each individual lecture or film screening to find out to what extent visitors were informed about governmental control over the freedom of speech in the USSR and how their attitudes changed after they learned about it from people who actually experienced it. We will be monitoring the attendance and will adjust our publicity plan if necessary in order to reach the maximum capacity for each event. We will make sure that our lecturers and administration will be available to answer any specific questions about the project during the events or anytime over the duration of the project by providing necessary contact information. We also plan to reach out to visitors after the project is over and conduct online discussions on the importance of the freedom of speech in the USA and in their home countries.

Example 2: From an Unsuccessful Applicant

Our festival audience will come away from the program with a greater sense of the world around them. We want our audience to gain a more global perspective. We will want our audience members to tell us how the stories they have heard affected them. This will allow us to gauge how impactful the program was to the community. Our immigration and culture day will strive to encourage others in the community to share their own story about immigration and cultural differences. There will also be a whiteboard outside of the social hall for members to write their thoughts and opinions on the speakers for immigration and culture day. An evaluation form will also be provided and attendees will be encourages to give feedback as well as suggestions for future programs. We will also evaluate the success of the lecture day by attendance and active participation of possible sponsors.

Guiding Questions

As you work on the Timeline section of your application, ask yourself the following questions:

  1. Do I have access to all of the necessary skills and resources to complete my project?
  2. Will I be able to achieve the project’s goals in a timely and efficient manner?

 

Think Like a Reviewer

The Council is most interested in supporting projects that are likely to achieve success, and for that reason, reviewers are looking for proposals that present a well conceived work plan.  You should consider all of the tasks that must be completed to accomplish your goals, from planning through execution, and set specific deadlines for their completion.  Reviewers will be most confident in those projects that have all of the major details (e.g., participation of project personnel, location of events, etc.) confirmed prior to application.

 

Consider This

Compare and contrast the following examples. Why do you think the first applicant was successful and the second applicant was not?

Example 1: From a Successful Applicant

Application Deadline: February 15, 2013

January 15: All participating scholars have been contacted and have agreed to offer presentations throughout our 2013 season. County Buildings and Grounds has confirmed the space and availability of 40 chairs to host speaking series. Curator has met with the Museum to identify objects for loan. Draft of grant application submitted.

February 15: Curator continues to work on Institutional Facilities Report, a requirement for the loan of objects from the Museum. She also works with the County to obtain an insurance policy rider for loaned objects. Formal application for a NJCH minigrant submitted.

March: Notification of grant award. Research and writing begins with work performed primarily by curator but assisted by intern. Curator will work with the County Press Agent to include an article in the spring county newsletter (distribution mid-May). Curator will also work with the county to create a post card mailing announcing the exhibit. University will be notified and will issue a press release. Distribution will take place in April.

April: Consultant reviews exhibition text. Exhibit panels are produced by Artguild. Objects obtained from Museum and staged in museum cases.

May: Exhibition opens with ongoing speaker series.

October: Exhibit and speaker series ends. Final report submitted.

Example 2: From an Unsuccessful Applicant

Application Deadline: August 15, 2013

During the beginning of the fall semester (August to September 2013), rooms and theater space will be scheduled for the lecture series. Meetings with partner student groups, community organizations and city agency officials will take place as well. Contacting mentioned speakers and participants to confim dates and times will take place. Follow up confirmations for them will occur weeks before the events. Finally informing faculty, students and community leaders of the series and will take place months before the event and fliers will be passed along as well.

Guiding Questions

As you work on the Budget section of your application, ask yourself the following questions:

  1. Have I budgeted wisely and completely?
  2. Do I have access to all of the skills and resources necessary to complete my project?
  3. Do the listed expenses represent reasonable and customary charges?

 

Think Like a Reviewer

When completing the Budget section of your application, you need to detail more than your dollar request to the Council.  As a technical matter, at least $1 in matching funds (cash or in-kind) is required for every dollar that you are requesting, but reviewers will also be looking to see: (1) whether or not you have access to all of the resources necessary to complete your project and (2) if project funds are being spent wisely.

If you’ve mentioned a task in your proposal narrative (e.g., mailing a save-the-date), it should be accounted for in your budget (e.g., printing and postage).  In addition to a budget breakdown, the Council requests that you provide information on other sources of support for your project.  In general, reviewers like when you are able to secure other funding and donations for your project.  If a project is dependent on much uncommitted funding or a proposal is missing major budget line items, reviewers will question its feasibility.

It is very important that you provide a thoroughly detailed budget with a transparent basis/method of computation for each line item.  After reading your proposal narrative, reviewers should understand why you’ve included each budget item, and each should represent a reasonable cost.  A budget listing excessive or unexplained costs will make your project less attractive to reviewers.

 

Consider This

Compare and contrast the following examples. Why do you think the first applicant was successful and the second applicant was not?

Example 1: From a Successful Applicant

Do you anticipate funding from sources other than NJCH for this project? Yes 200

Do you anticipate any earned income? No

If yes, please explain the source of earned income.

Do in-kind services make up any of the cost share? Yes 1479.50

If yes, please explain the sources and uses for all in-kind services.

Part of our own agency budget will be dedicated to covering certain costs involved with this project, namely, salaries and benefits for all personnel, except the presenter, at 100%, as well as a percentage of services including telephone, postage and advertising and the rental of the room.

Is the project for which NJCH funding is requested part of a larger project? No

Indicate funding sources other than NJCH on the table below and whether funding is committed or potential.

Source

Amount

Purpose

Committed/Potential?

Private Donation

200.00

to support this program

Committed


Salaries & Benefits

Name

Title of Position

# of Persons

Basis/Method of Computation

NJCH Request

Cost Share

Total

Name

Director of Senior Services

1

10 hrs @ $30/hour

0.00

300.00

300.00

Name

Asst. Dir. of Senior Services

1

20 hrs@ $22/hour

0.00

440.00

440.00

Front Desk Staff

1

8 hrs@ $15/hour

0.00

120.00

120.00

Maintenance

1

4 hrs@ $22/hour

0.00

88.00

88.00

Name

Director of Marketing

1

4 hours @ $30/hour

0.00

120.00

120.00

 

 

Request

Share

Grand Total

Totals:

0.00

1,068.00

1,068.00


Fees for Project Personnel

Name and Role

# of Days on Project

Daily Rate of Compensation

NJCH Request

Cost Share

Total

Name, Presenter

2

400.00

800.00

0.00

800.00

 

 

Request

Share

Grand Total

Totals:

800.00

0.00

800.00


Travel & Subsistence

Name

Start Location

End Location

Type of Transportation

Total Travel Days

Food Costs

Lodging Costs

Trans. Costs

NJCH Request

Cost Share

Total

0

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

 

 

Request

Share

Grand Total

Totals:

0.00

0.00

0.00


Supplies

Item

Basis/Method of Computation

NJCH Request

Cost Share

Total

0.00

0.00

0.00

 

 

Request

Share

Grand Total

Totals:

0.00

0.00

0.00


Services

Item

Basis/Method of Computation

NJCH Request

Cost Share

Total

Telephone

12 calls @ $1.00

0.00

12.00

12.00

postcards

550 @ .10

55.00

0.00

55.00

Postage

550 postcards @ .25

75.00

62.50

137.50

flyers

800 @ .08

64.00

0.00

64.00

Postage

flyers included in Sr. Booklet mailing 550 @ .04

0.00

22.00

22.00

 

 

Request

Share

Grand Total

Totals:

194.00

96.50

290.50


Other Costs

Item

Basis/Method of Computation

NJCH Request

Cost Share

Total

Facility Rental – Board Room

$100.00 x 2

0.00

200.00

200.00

Advertisements

ads in local papers NJ Jewish News (2 editions), The Sentinels (Edison and East Brunswick), The Criterion, The Home News Tribune, The Princetonian and the Targum

685.00

315.00

1000.00

 

 

Request

Share

Grand Total

Totals:

685.00

515.00

1,200.00


Budget Summary

 

Budget Categories

NJCH Request

Cost Share

Total Costs

1. Salaries & Benefits

0.00

1,068.00

1,068.00

2. Fees for Personnel

800.00

0.00

800.00

3. Travel & Subsistence

0.00

0.00

0.00

4. Supplies & Materials

0.00

0.00

0.00

5. Services

194.00

96.50

290.50

6. Other Costs

685.00

515.00

1,200.00

7. Total Project Costs

1,679.00

1,679.50

3,358.50

 

Example 2: From an Unsuccessful Applicant

Do you anticipate funding from sources other than NJCH for this project? Yes

Do you anticipate any earned income? No

If yes, please explain the source of earned income.

Do in-kind services make up any of the cost share? No

If yes, please explain the sources and uses for all in-kind services.

Is the project for which NJCH funding is requested part of a larger project? No

Indicate funding sources other than NJCH on the table below and whether funding is committed or potential.

Source

Amount

Purpose

Committed/Potential?

City Market

1000.00

awards

Potential

Cultural Heritage Commission

3000.00

supporting promotional materials

Potential


Salaries & Benefits

Name

Title of Position

# of Persons

Basis/Method of Computation

NJCH Request

Cost Share

Total

Name

Curatorial Intern

0

10$/hour, working 30 hour

150.00

150.00

300.00

Name

Public Relations Intern

0

$20/hour, working 30 hours

300.00

300.00

600.00

 

 

Request

Share

Grand Total

Totals:

450.00

450.00

900.00


Fees for Project Personnel

Name and Role

# of Days on Project

Daily Rate of Compensation

NJCH Request

Cost Share

Total

Name, Presenter

1

600.00

600.00

0.00

600.00

Name, Presenter

1

600.00

600.00

0.00

600.00

 

 

Request

Share

Grand Total

Totals:

1,200.00

0.00

1,200.00


Travel & Subsistence

Name

Start Location

End Location

Type of Transportation

Total Travel Days

Food Costs

Lodging Costs

Trans. Costs

NJCH Request

Cost Share

Total

0

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

 

 

Request

Share

Grand Total

Totals:

0.00

0.00

0.00


Supplies

Item

Basis/Method of Computation

NJCH Request

Cost Share

Total

Phone/Internet

work phone and internet fees

0.00

335.00

335.00

Printing

brochures/flyers/postcards/press releases

600.00

600.00

1200.00

Office Supplies

paper/framing/ink/letters/printing/computer supplies

150.00

150.00

300.00

 

 

Request

Share

Grand Total

Totals:

750.00

1,085.00

1,835.00


Services

Item

Basis/Method of Computation

NJCH Request

Cost Share

Total

Rentals

gallery rent

0.00

9000.00

9000.00

Art and space Insurance

0.00

900.00

900.00

Postage

mailing postcards/advertisements/flyers/brochures

300.00

0.00

300.00

Graphic Design

web design/poster design/advertisement design

300.00

1200.00

1500.00

 

 

Request

Share

Grand Total

Totals:

600.00

11,100.00

11,700.00


Other Costs

Item

Basis/Method of Computation

NJCH Request

Cost Share

Total

0.00

0.00

0.00

 

 

Request

Share

Grand Total

Totals:

0.00

0.00

0.00


Budget Summary

 

Budget Categories

NJCH Request

Cost Share

Total Costs

1. Salaries & Benefits

450.00

450.00

900.00

2. Fees for Personnel

1,200.00

0.00

1,200.00

3. Travel & Subsistence

0.00

0.00

0.00

4. Supplies & Materials

750.00

1,085.00

1,835.00

5. Services

600.00

11,100.00

11,700.00

6. Other Costs

0.00

0.00

0.00

7. Total Project Costs

3,000.00

12,635.00

15,635.00

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