Justice

Beyond Binaries: Justice for Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming People

Gender in American political institutions is simultaneously under-defined and over-determined. This talk will describe government efforts to reveal authentic gender identity and to control individuals’ gender presentation. Transgender and gender non-conforming people are subject to two sorts of impulses to fix gender – first, to pin it down, and then, to “correct” it. Using examples ranging from incarceration to healthcare to education to marriage and child custody disputes, we will explore the consequences of official identity declaration and will discuss the complexities of binary gender categories. We will talk together about how gender categories are defined and enforced.

Kiki Jamieson
President, The Fund for New Jersey

Sex, Gender, and Sexuality: Are Women Human?

This talk explores the question of whether women’s rights are human rights. Using examples from history, literature, and contemporary politics, we will discuss gender differences, gender disparities, and the consequences of policies built on those understandings.

Kiki Jamieson
President, The Fund for New Jersey

Jail the Innocent or Free the Guilty? The Politics of Crime and Punishment in the U.S.

The power of the state to keep us safe is most visible when it is used to incarcerate law-breakers. This lecture will describe the decisions that must be made before a person’s freedom is denied, and will provide several vivid examples of situations in which those calculations are complex. How certain of guilt must we be to justify punishment? Are there limits to the punishment we may impose? In an imperfect criminal justice system, how many errors can we tolerate? Discussion will cover questions of capital punishment, torture as a tactic of information-gathering, and the moral dues we owe to the wrongly convicted.

Kiki Jamieson
President, The Fund for New Jersey

Racial Preferences, Reparations and Questions of Justice

What is owed to those who have suffered harms? Using examples from Japanese-American internment, Jim Crow segregation, and contemporary affirmative action debates, we will address questions of political, economic, and educational fairness. This talk examines what the courts have decided, what legislators have tried to do, and how we might think about this complex political issue.

Kiki Jamieson
President, The Fund for New Jersey

Speech and Hate Speech: Conflict Within the First Amendment

Ought we to proscribe certain categories of speech? The speaker provides criteria and examples of sanctionable speech under various college codes and asks: Under what conditions are words so inherently wrong/bad/dangerous that they ought to be forbidden?

Milton Heumann, Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Political Science, Rutgers University

Program only available in Bergen and Middlesex counties.

The Supreme Court in the Democratic System

To paraphrase the Rev. Falwell: “Should we have nine old folks overriding what is democratically decided?” How can we reconcile a Supreme Court with democratic principles? Is there a real tension? Should the Court “oppose” popular preferences with respect to the death penalty, abortion and prayer in school? This lecture raises these and other questions and involves participants in arriving at answers.

Milton Heumann, Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Political Science, Rutgers University

Program only available in Bergen and Middlesex counties.

Equal Marriage: Challenges to a Familiar Institution

Contemporary debates about same-sex marriage raise questions about the foundations of legal marriage itself. Why is the state in the marriage business? What are the connections between religious marriage and legal marriage? Is marriage a just institution? Using examples pulled from the headlines, the courtrooms, and history, we will explore the dimensions of this debate.

Kiki Jamieson
President, The Fund for New Jersey

Justice for All?

What are the cultural values and ideas that would make “justice” for individuals to be more important than what happens to the “all” as a result? Or vice versa so that “justice” is better achieved when the effect on the “all” is given preference? In other words, can a nation be seriously multicultural without also diversifying what “justice for all” means? If so, how?

Cathy Bao Bean
Author, Educational Consultant, retired philosophy professor

New Jersey’s Modern Politics

A survey of the state’s politics and governmental institutions under the Constitution of 1947. In particular, New Jersey’s modern governors will be surveyed.

William Gillette, Ph.D.
Professor of History, Rutgers University

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